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Post Info TOPIC: Tire Covers


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Tire Covers


For the first time, we will be spending three months in one place (Arizona) over the winter.  During the rest of the year we move   about every two weeks.  In the past we have never considered tire covers because we moved so frequently.   I am wondering if tire covers are truly beneficial, or, can they cause more harm than good with heat buildup?  Your thoughts and experiences are appreciated.

Frank



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Barb and Frank

2016 Landmark Key West

2016 Ram 3500/Cummins Diesel/4WD



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Yes, tire covers are beneficial when sitting for long periods and where there is direct sun on the tires for a few hours each day. I prefer tire "screens" that hang down (like RV Quickshades Tire Cover Kit or SunGuard Tire-Savers) and block the UV rays rather than the covers that wrap around the tires. The wrap-around tire covers can hold in heat which can be worse than the UV rays, while the hanging screens allow the air to flow around the tires. 

The wrap-around tire covers are even worse in humid climates as they then hold in moisture as well as heat and that combination is horrible for tires.

Of course, sometimes slideouts will shade tires completely in which case there is no need for the tire covers.

A couple of other suggestions would be:

1) When sitting that long, make sure you have something under the tires and that they are not sitting directly on asphalt, concrete, or gravel. You can use plastic leveling blocks, but I really like horse mats or rubber paver squares which you can usually find at Home Depot, Walmart, Menard's, etc.

2) Hitch up and drive your rig a few miles once a month. It's a pain in the rear and almost nobody does it, but exercising the entire rig and the tires is good for it. Rolling the tires heats them up and activates the chemicals in the rubber (including UV protectors) that are there to protect the tires. Plus, when you return and re-park, you'll likely be parked on a different part of the tire rubber which helps prevent the tires from developing flat spots.



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Thanks Howard - the information is much appreciated.

Frank



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Barb and Frank

2016 Landmark Key West

2016 Ram 3500/Cummins Diesel/4WD



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I cover my TT tires if stationary for more than three nights. Yes, they are beneficial. UV is not your friend.

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Tire covers are in my professional opinion worthless. Most high quality radial tires built today have been compounded to reduce the amount of oxidation that was prevalent years ago. That being said some manufacturers do a better job then others. Goodyear spent millions improving their tires to prevent sidewall checking or channel cracking. Bridgestone also does an excellent job. Michelin on the other hand does stand up but will start to grey and begin to check over time.

Sidewall checking in most instances isn’t a reason to replace the tires, just like channel cracking (cracks in the face of the tire). If you can see steel belting in the checking or cracks then it’s time to replace the tire. Lite checking/cracking is very acceptable.

As a reference, there are millions of semi trailers sitting around for months in yards that don’t have wheel covers on them. If this was a major concern for these trucking firms, seeing how tires represent their number 2 or 3rd highest expense, one would think they would invest in covers to protect their investment.

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Thanks LarryW21 and Rickl -  much food for thought.

Frank



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2016 Landmark Key West

2016 Ram 3500/Cummins Diesel/4WD



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Just a simple anecdote of our own experience.  We sit in one place for months and months at a time.  In come cases, our RV has been shaded and in others it hasn't.  Being a fifth wheel, the slides do "cover" them to some degree, but we've never put tire covers or screens up to protect them.

That said, our RV was built in 2010 (haven't checked the tire's date codes) and the tires have never been changed.  As of when we parked here back in last year (July, I think), there was absolutely no sidewall checkering nor cracking between the treads of the tires.  We are getting new axles on our rig later this month (getting rid of Never-Lube bearings) and will follow that up with new tires, simply because of their age.  From what I can see of the tires right now, they still seem to be in good shape.  (Goodyear G114's)

Terry



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Terry and Jo

2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
2008 Ford F450
2019 Ford Expedition Max as Tag-along or Scout

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Terry and Jo wrote:

Just a simple anecdote of our own experience.  We sit in one place for months and months at a time.  In come cases, our RV has been shaded and in others it hasn't.  Being a fifth wheel, the slides do "cover" them to some degree, but we've never put tire covers or screens up to protect them.

That said, our RV was built in 2010 (haven't checked the tire's date codes) and the tires have never been changed.  As of when we parked here back in last year (July, I think), there was absolutely no sidewall checkering nor cracking between the treads of the tires.  We are getting new axles on our rig later this month (getting rid of Never-Lube bearings) and will follow that up with new tires, simply because of their age.  From what I can see of the tires right now, they still seem to be in good shape.  (Goodyear G114's)

Terry


 Terry,

It is amazing to think that you still have original tires - we, too, have Goodyear G114’s and hope they last half as long as yours!

Frank



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Barb and Frank

2016 Landmark Key West

2016 Ram 3500/Cummins Diesel/4WD



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Barb and Frank wrote:
Terry and Jo wrote:

Just a simple anecdote of our own experience.  We sit in one place for months and months at a time.  In come cases, our RV has been shaded and in others it hasn't.  Being a fifth wheel, the slides do "cover" them to some degree, but we've never put tire covers or screens up to protect them.

That said, our RV was built in 2010 (haven't checked the tire's date codes) and the tires have never been changed.  As of when we parked here back in last year (July, I think), there was absolutely no sidewall checkering nor cracking between the treads of the tires.  We are getting new axles on our rig later this month (getting rid of Never-Lube bearings) and will follow that up with new tires, simply because of their age.  From what I can see of the tires right now, they still seem to be in good shape.  (Goodyear G114's)

Terry


 Terry,

It is amazing to think that you still have original tires - we, too, have Goodyear G114’s and hope they last half as long as yours!

Frank


 

I don't know.  Maybe we just live right.  Last July (2018 actually), we finally replaced the four original batteries in the fifth wheel as well.  They were 8 years old, and the only maintenance I did on them was to check them once a year and add distilled water to the cells.  (Our fifth wheel has a 3000 watt Xantrex inverter, so that is the reason for it having 4 batteries.)

Terry



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Terry and Jo

2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
2008 Ford F450
2019 Ford Expedition Max as Tag-along or Scout

Our photos on Smugmug



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I am using Camco 45323 Vinyl Wheel and I saw that it really good. It protecting my RV’s wheels and tires from corrosion, dirt, and the sun.

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I had this very discussion with an ex truck driver who now owns a motorhome. He said that trailers sit for months in shipping yards and motorhomes and 5th wheels sit on dealer lots for years. He said that tire covers were completely unnecessary ... That is one man's opinion. He does practice what he preaches in that his rig sits for 6 months to a year between moves.

My slides pretty well cover my tires so I never worry about it ... but that just becomes my opinion.

Obviously, it can't hurt to use them ... just not sure if it's worth the trouble.



-- Edited by RonC on Thursday 30th of July 2020 03:36:06 PM

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2016 Ford F350, King Ranch, DRW, 4x4, CC, 6.7 PS Diesel, remote control air lift system

2017 Durango Gold 381REF, Lambright furniture, Truma AquaGo, MCD shades, morRYDE IS, 8K Disc brakes, GY G114  LR H Tires, 27,320 lbs CGVW

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RonC wrote:

I had this very discussion with an ex truck driver who now owns a motorhome. He said that trailers sit for months in shipping yards and motorhomes and 5th wheels sit on dealer lots for years. He said that tire covers were completely unnecessary ... That is one man's opinion. He does practice what he preaches in that his rig sits for 6 months to a year between moves.

My slides pretty well cover my tires so I never worry about it ... but that just becomes my opinion.

Obviously, it can't hurt to use them ... just not sure if it's worth the trouble.



-- Edited by RonC on Thursday 30th of July 2020 03:36:06 PM


 I totally agree with Ron as tires today are formulated to help fight oxidation. To Ron’s point there are 1000’s of trailers sitting in yards without covers. I remember back in the early 80’s when I entered the tire industry sidewall cracking, graying, and channel cracking was somewhat common. But now it is minimal at best in comparison. As a full timer and meeting people I get this question all the time. My answer is do what makes you comfortable. Obviously personally I wouldn’t spend the money myself. 



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Just as an FYI, sidewall cracking isn't the end-all in analyzing one's tires.  We had to replace the tires on our F450 a couple of years ago and the sidewalls had absolutely NO cracking at all.  However, looking into the treads showed pretty good sized cracks, thus they got replaced.

Terry



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Terry and Jo

2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
2008 Ford F450
2019 Ford Expedition Max as Tag-along or Scout

Our photos on Smugmug

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