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Post Info TOPIC: Do RVers need a handyman?


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Do RVers need a handyman?


Hi everyone.  I am a handyman with a lot of RV experience (80% electric) and I am thinking about trying to make money by doing odd jobs for RVers, and I assume that means mostly in RV parks.  I am looking into buying my own RV but at the moment I am a tent camper who camps in the bush, comes in to town as needed.  If I make enough money I'll buy a slide-in camper soon.

Does anyone here see handymen like this in RV parks, etc?  Do you think there is enough work in a full RV park for someone like me to make money?  Would the RV park have a problem with it?  Is $25/hour a reasonable rate?  And how would you proceed?  Just walk around handing out business cards?

Any advice you can provide would be really helpful.

Thank you.

Matt



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Most RV parks don't allow conducting business from your RV on an obvious basis, but I've been put in touch in years gone by upon asking at front desk of someone staying in the park that has the skills we've needed for a repair/diagnosis, and even upon talking to a neighbour who referred someone staying in the park. If your business decals are on your coach that alone should attract some interest, but be careful you don't end up interrupted at all hours of the day and night!!! Maybe direct to a website with a form they can complete with their issue/needs, names, contact info and which site they are at and a proviso will respond within 'x' hours.

Maybe upon arrival at the CG, explain what you do, and ask them if anyone looking for assistance would they hand out your card. Also ask if you can also post a small flyer with tear off contact info in the laundry room on the notice board where most folks advertise something for sale or free.

For sure I'd be much happier paying you $25 an hour versus the $90 to $160/hr labour door rates we've been quoted at dealerships/garages both north and south of the border, plus the convenience of being on site.

There's a lot of folks out there that are totally hands off on even minor repairs, and then there are those that aren't as fit as they were a few years earlier for accessing easy to do their own repairs/renewals any more.

Good luck, SD



-- Edited by Someday on Wednesday 11th of November 2015 09:31:20 PM

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Most RV parks have Mobile RV repair services listed in their guides, services that paid for the ad and are bonded. These services normally are in vans or trucks full of common spare parts and tools, so they can often do the work in one visit. That is your competition.

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If you know all aspects of RV repair and are good at it you should have no trouble making money wherever you go because if there was any product in this world that's has multiple failures and constantly!! its a RV !!

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I certainly know that RVs need constant repair and I do know a lot of RV repair.  But the question is how to go about it.  Did you have any insight into that, or answers to my questions?



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Ah that's good to know.  Licensed and bonded, huh?  What's that? :)



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Thanks for that reply, but I think you may have misread my post.  I am not an RVer, and I don't stay in RV parks.  For one thing, I couldn't afford it but maybe if I can start making good money this way, I'll buy a slide-in camper someday.  I camp, and would like to make some money while I do that by working as a handyman for RVers.

 

You said "Maybe upon arrival at the CG,"  What's "the CG?"

 

Then you said: "explain what you do, and ask them if anyone looking for assistance would they hand out your card. Also ask if you can also post a small flyer with tear off contact info in the laundry room on the notice board where most folks advertise something for sale or free."

Would I even have access to the laundry rooms at RV parks as a non-guest?  Is this sort of thing only likely to work if I'm staying long-term?  I can only camp for 14 days at a time, max.

Last summer, I did hand out business cards at RV parks.  I only got one call all summer long, and that was about a month after I had left that area.  So I'm not thinking my odds of making that work are too good, but maybe there's info that i'm missing?

Thanks for your time.



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RV-Dreams Family Member

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your posts in my opinion are not making any sense at all.

If your as good at RV repair as you allude to on this forum I suggest you go get a job at a Rv repair center

the pay is good and u can make some good money  etc



-- Edited by ticat900 on Thursday 12th of November 2015 11:00:08 PM

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Sorry, suggestions were based on your being an RVer in the Campgrounds (CG's) yourself.

Ticat900 gave a good suggestion.

 



-- Edited by Someday on Thursday 12th of November 2015 11:24:38 PM

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HandyMatt,

You need to stay in the RV parks (campgrounds, CG) that your clients would be staying at - not out at some state/federal campground. Most of us would like to think that the person working on our rig knows about RVs not about tents. The RV techs that around the parks we stay in have vans with their name/phone number on them and often they advertise in the park handout map. They build up a working relationship with parks in the area. Word of mouth by park owners is their bread and butter. Take Ticat900 advise and get a job at an RV service center to make some money before you try this.

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From someone who makes a living on the road thru campgrounds..........you will have to open up areas you work in.....hoping to make a decent amount of money in one campground just doesnt happen unless you have that gotta have service........have you thought about using craigslist in the area your in .........there are alot of venue's now in the digital age that increase customer base.....

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Handymatt, look at yourself from your customer's point of view. Imagine you are in a Newell motorhome (very expensive brand, if you don't recognize it). A slide isn't behaving, and you can't make it behave yourself, so you go to the campground office and ask if they can recommend someone. They hand you a business card for someone that claims to be an RV handyman. You call the number, explain your problem, and the voice on the phone says "Yes, I could take care of that, but right now I'm 1000 miles from there." How would you feel, and what would you do? Most people would go back to the campground office and tell the person at the desk that the person on that card is worthless, and why. The desk person would most likely toss the rest of your cards in the trash. That's the best result for your business. The manager just might decide to keep one of your cards with a note to run you off if you ever return. Now imagine this happening all over the country.

If your intent is to become a full-time RV'er, traveling the country, your best bet would be to get an RV and plan on helping those who are in the park you are in. You will have to be careful about advertising, especially in some States, as you are competing with locals who may not welcome your competition. One way to do that would be to put something on the doors of your tow vehicle or towed with a cell phone number and an address in a place that either has no license requirements or that you can meet. That location would also be your official domicile, which means that your vehicles are licensed there, your driver's license is there, etc.

The other alternative is to do as others have suggested. Get a job with a mobile RV outfit. You won't be traveling the country, but you will be making a decent living.

BTW, for those who think they like the idea of $25.00/hour instead of $90.00+/hour, remember that the person actually doing the work doesn't get that much. Much of that money goes for insurance, taxes, inventory, utilities, etc. that go with owning a business. HandyMatt, you might want to think about your pricing ideas.

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