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Post Info TOPIC: Minnesota to Oregon in December. Route suggestions please.


RV-Dreams Community Member

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Minnesota to Oregon in December. Route suggestions please.


hi, since im from minnesota im already a looney haha 

inexperienced rv driver looking for safest route... I 70? More snow less elevation? 

Thanks.

 



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RV-Dreams Family Member

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I-70 passes on Colorado seems to be a bit more treacherous than I-80 in Wyoming, so my preference would be I-80 in December.  I would not even want to try I-90 through Montana.  Which part of OR are you heading to?  Northern or Southern and how far west?



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I have driven 90 many times in smaller vehicles, i dont remember much elevation. Just boring.

you would worry about snow? As a new driver, im more afraid of icing and elevation. 

I think the wyoming route might be best Of the northern routes. 

May look at smaller highways south out of denver

 Southern oregon



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I-90 in Western Montana and Northern ID has several passes, so unless you're dropping south before you hit Western Montana you will have elevation.

Suggest you get a Mountain Pass Directory to study your options.

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FT - July 2013

 

2010 38TKSB3 DRV Mobile Suites

2012 Ford F450

 

Dale and Ruth Travelling with Tazzy Kat!

 

IMAG0142_zps070d30d8.jpg

 

 

 

 



RV-Dreams Family Member

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From your headline I am inferring  some trepidation about the timeframe, not so much the actual route.

Just me, but just because it's December shouldn't mean that much. The actual weather conditions are what's relevant. Yeah it gets cold, yeah it snows, yeah the passes can be issues, but they have crews that plow and sand or salt the roads on the bad days and after the slush and snow are removed, the roads are fine. Known problem areas are well marked so pay attention to signage as appropriate. Wind will always be an issue... slow down or simply don't move on those days.  If you have an agenda or time schedule you have to meet, then leaving earlier or taking a more southerly route might/should be part of your plans. If you are planning on stopping for long enough to expose the rig to harsh cold or other conditions that could adversely affect you or your equipment, take appropriate precautions. Other than that, December travel is not something that should be feared, just dealt with accordingly in northern climates at that time of year. 

If your peace of mind desires to take a more southerly route for other reasons, that is okay but it would be a different conversation. Specific routes I can't help you with, other than to say if you are merely relocating from MN to OR the interstate highway system will most likely serve you well whatever route you take. 

FWIW, Brian



-- Edited by biggaRView on Saturday 7th of November 2015 09:42:21 AM

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RV-Dreams Community Member

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Thanks for the replies so far. What i gather is that rv's can handle snow, ice and mountains.
As a new rv driver though, these conditions appear as unknowns.
Which should i be most concerned with?
Im feeling that ice, elevation and wind are a deadly combination for such a large, relatively light vehicle.

It would be golden to here from someone who has made these routes in winter.

The middle routes seem more treacherous, so it the weather is poor on the north it seem like the far south is the only option.
I remeber Glacier Parks main through road was closed in June for snow when we were there.
Maybe that doesnt apply here, but sections of interstate are forced to close.
Im not on a huge hurry, but again its winter in an rv so i wont be fully self contained.

Thanks again.
Oh, also might be pulling a van.

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Road closures on major arteries like interstate highways are temporary not seasonal. Less travelled roads can be closed for months during the winter especially at higher elevations. Obviously you want to avoid those roads if they are still open because they could close at any time. I have been over I80 pass from Reno a few times and each time (all different times of the year) the road was clear and dry. Part of this was timing, but the largest part is my choice to not attempt it when conditions suggested that the trip was unwise. That same logic applies on various other passes I have been through. You are in control of when and if you take a particular route. That is your biggest strength when making any trip in relative safety. The power to say "I choose not to go at this time. Waiting until conditions improve is the safer choice." Having options gives you power. Understanding the things you have concerns about also gives you power to make wiser choices. Don't psyche yourself out with any preconceived ideas that could influence your decision making.

JMHO, Brian

 



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Brian, Cindi & Josie (our fur baby)
2017 RAM 3500 Laramie 4x4 CCLB, CTD, Aisin, B&W hitch, dually
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RV-Dreams Community Member

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Golden, Brian. Thank you. I have told my kids the part about the options, seemingly in vain.

I wonder though, is anyone ready to declare that rv is safe in winter driving?
The only thing I have heard isthat they actually handle o.k. in the snow due to HEAVYNESS in back especially. That streangth seems to me could very quickly turn into a Big liabilty with incline wind and black ice. Being from minnesota black ice is basically exhauste condesing on a seemingly clear and dry road.
Merci, Emelle



-- Edited by Emelle on Saturday 7th of November 2015 08:06:20 PM



-- Edited by Emelle on Saturday 7th of November 2015 08:07:10 PM

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RV-Dreams Family Member

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Watch your weather forecasts for any route considered.  In the cases of both I-70 and I-80, if necessary they will close the interstates, and I have no idea how long it takes to get them reopened.  Whichever way you would go, I think you might would want to have alternate southern routes to consider unless you are prepared to wait it out in some northern location.  Plus, if the roads are closed, I'd suspect that motels would be at a premium and RV parks might all be closed.

Terry



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Emelle,

The Glacier Park road you are thinking about is Logan Pass - the "Going to the Sun" road. That is only open about 3 months during the year and is a car/pickup (small) road only.

You still haven't said where you are going - "Southern Oregon" is a pretty big area and we need more information. For example, if you are heading to the southern Oregon coast, there are different routes than if you are heading to Medford.

Could you also tell us about your rig. Can you easily pull off and be self-sufficient for a day or two waiting for roads to clear? How much driving time do you have behind the wheel?




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