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Post Info TOPIC: Full Time and Horses


RV-Dreams Family Member

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Full Time and Horses


I was just wondering if anyone who is full time travels with horses. We plan on performing and selling our merchandise at renaiseance festivals and the like. I have thought about getting a couple horses to do things like pony rides and such. I was just wondering if anyone knows what regulations and maybe some tips about traveling iwth horses. Thanks.



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From what you are saying, you are going to need an additional pickup to tow a horse trailer as well as the feed and other supplies you might need for them.  So far as I know, you wouldn't have problems with being able to tow a trailer with them in it, but you might have a problem with finding a place for them once you stop somewhere for the night or longer.

With that considered, any place you would camp would need space for basically two rigs; RV and tow vehicle or toad as well as the truck and horse trailer.  You would likely be charged for two sites instead of being able to get by with one.

Also, the places you stop may have regulations on having horses or ponies.  There would also be the need to stop on occasion and allow the horses to move around and graze as well as get to water.  When traveling, the water might be hard to get to them.

Now, I am not speaking from the standpoint of one who has "traveled" with horses, but Jo and I used to be on the farm and dealt with horses a lot because we also had cattle.  However, we seldom ever had our horses in a trailer for more than an hour.

One other thing, thinking of this from the "business" side of things.  I'm not sure that you would profit enough from "pony rides" to pay for all the extra things and feed you would need to properly care for the horse(s).

Terry



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RV-Dreams Family Member

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Horse trailers with living quarters can be a very nice way to "have your cake and eat it too". I used to haul our horses around the SE US when I showed many years ago. That was before LQ trailers came out, and we stayed in a stall next to the horses or a nearby motel.

Nowadays there are parks that offer equestrian areas for trail riding & such. Some even offer corrals already set up.

Wherever you go, you will be subject to carrying extensive veterinarian certifications, like Coggins and such. And crossing over state lines will require a stop at the DOT inspection stations - hopefully NOT a quarantine - but be prepared on your scheduling. I haven't checked recently, but do an extensive search on this before you totally commit to it.

Many CPG's won't even let you bring in firewood from another area (let alone another state), as "they" have determined that foreign critters can spread too quickly causing damage to the native flora & fauna. There are some parks that are geared towards equine guests - check into the national trail riders' websites.

Traveling with livestock can be much more restrictive than having to apply for food-sale permits at festivals. This can take months sometimes- especially for first-time vendors around the country.

Do LOTS of research ahead of time. Have fun ... would love to hear how it works out for you.



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Thanks everyone. You have given me alot to think about. I'm still not sure if we are going to do that. We are still working on details before we get full time. All while planning our wedding. LOL. Thanks again.

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You would like to get horses to do pony rides?

Horses cannot stand tied forever...you need a place to let them run and stretch their legs..........and to lie down to sleep, which most will not do while tied, and that itself can turn into a dangerous panicked horse tangled in a tie.

There are a lot of liabilities involved with "pony rides".  Proper equipment, helmets, well fitting tack........horses with suitable temperaments to be around crowds and kids and balloons and noises.....

How much space will you have for hauling hay?  And advance planning to find hay when you need it?  What about hauling adequate amounts of water, horses drink a lot of water...........

I've had horses all my life.......and I love my horses.......but would never subject them to "full timing" without having pre-arranged boarding lined up well in advance so they could rest and run and eat some grass.

Also, health certificates are valid for 30 days - meaning every thirty days, if you are crossing any state lines, you need another certificate of health from a veterinarian....immunizations required for different areas that have outbreaks of different horse-related diseases..........wow.......that would get pricey.

What about farrier care? Are you going to hunt out a new farrier every six weeks?  Proper foot care requires trimming every six to eight in the summer, maybe a little less in winter, but it is crucial for a healthy horse.

 

Just my opinion, this does not sound like a happy lifestyle for any equine....

 

 



-- Edited by scrappy on Thursday 27th of June 2013 01:55:47 PM

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i'm going to have to agree. horses or ponies, even minis are vastly different from cats and dogs and require a ton of specialised resources.
if you love horses then by all means spend a year or three working around them and learn how to keep yourself and them safe.

they are insanely delicate creatures and far too many suffer from well intentioned ignorance. i'm not calling you ignorant by any means, but i learned (as did my first long suffering equines) the hard way just how delicate and special they are.
horses don't express discomfort or pain the way other animals do and not knowing what to look for many times means before you realise it it's too late to help them. many, many horses suffer life threatening illness before their owners know what's happening.
and trust me, horse vets are $$$$$$$$!!!!!!!!
i know, as i think we've put several vets' kids through college i bet!

someday i'd like to bring my mare out west for a year of exploring the trails, but the investment in an appropriate rig and such is beyond me atm.

ime horse trailers with living quarters are just not as comfortable for full timing as you might like unless you can afford a featherlite luxury villa for instance.

best of luck with your adventures--i beg of you to get as much experience with horses as you can before you delve into horse ownership.



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Don't worry. It was just an idea. We were never sure of it. We have decided to work more on our store.

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