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Post Info TOPIC: Planks under tires


RV-Dreams Community Member

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Planks under tires


Why is it necessary to place planks or strips of wood under the tires on RV vehicles when parked? I understand the reason for wood under the leveling jacks and can only assume that the same practice should be used to prevent the RV from settling. Any information and suggestions on what is the best material to use would be appreciated.

-- Edited by Springtime at 11:12, 2007-09-03

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Boards are placed under the tires to level an RV. Sometimes also to help prevent sinking if parked on very soft ground. That's all. Make sure ALL of the tire is on the board and that both tires of a dually are supported as well to prevent tire damage by stressing the internal belts.

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Dude, I could be wrong about this, but if you're storing the RV for a long period of time I think that being up off the ground would help prevent the tires from dry rotting.  Darrell

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Dude you are talking about Dually tires being on flat wood plank, I take it as so not to confuse everyone you are talking of MH only and not a dually tuck?
southwestjudy & Bob & 2blackdogs


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It is said that concrete will leach the additives out of tires so you need to separate tires from concrete pads for long term stays. I think Jack Mayer knows but he hasn't weighed in, yet.

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If I understand it correctly (thats a big if) dry rot is caused only from the UV rays of the sun.  Cover your tires with somethig blocking out the suns rays can prevent dry rot but I don't think putting a plank under them will do anything except to help from keeping them from sinking into soft ground or level the rig as Dude says. Of course if you are on concrete no boards would be necessary (unless you may be un-level) obviously you would not sink into the concrete pad.  I park my truck everyday in the (concrete floor) garage--dealerships have concrete floors, repair shops have concrete floors, if you store on concrete I don't think you have much to worry about except UV rays. 
My 2 cents worth.
 
Flyone

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From what I was told at tire store Bill is right about extended stays in one place on concrete.I store my SunnyBrook in a building with concrete floors and put 1x 6 boards under tires and tire covers over tires even though it's inside.

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Re: Planks... A tire - all tires, whether a dually or single on a MH or trailer, MUST be fully supported across its entire tread. Otherwise, you will stress the belts and potentially cause a premature failure.

Concrete and batteries: Myth today, the battery cases today are impermeable plastic and unaffected in any way by contact with concrete. This was true back in the days a battery case was made of permeable rubber (like 50 years ago), the lime in concrete could leach through those rubber cases into the battery and neutralize the acid back then, but NOT today.

Concrete and tires. I will make the assertion that this is also a myth. Based on my knowledge of chemistry and tires, there are no issues what-so-ever in a tire in constant contact with concrete. The real issue is UV (use covers if exposed to sun) and oxidation caused by everyday pollution (can't do anything about this one).

What you DO ideally want is to store a vehicle - any type of vehicle - so that there is NO weight on the tires by blocking it from the suspension. This is what the museums do. This is to eliminate stresses in the tires and stop flat-spotting - it has nothing to do with chemistry.


-- Edited by RVDude at 05:29, 2007-09-05

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