2018 RV-Dreams Boondocking Rally - March 5 - 12, 2018 in Quartzsite, Arizona.
SOLD OUT!!

2018 RV-Dreams Reunion Rally - March 27 - April 1, 2018 in Pahrump, Nevada
Registration Is Now Open!! Click Here To Get More Information & To Register

2018 RV-Dreams Spring Educational Rally - April 23 -29, 2018 in Pahrump, Nevada
Spots Still Available!! Click Here To Get More Information & To Register

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: How easy or difficult to do everything by yourself


RV-Dreams Community Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 5
Date:
How easy or difficult to do everything by yourself


Hello all.  I am new to this forum.

I want to full time when I retire and have been researching RV's. I am single, so that brings me to my question:

What is going to be easiest as far a hooking up and setting up when it's only 1 person? I can't decide on whether to get a MH with a toad or a truck/TT or truck/5'ver combination. I would really prefer not to have to buy a big truck and use it as a daily driver once I get some where. But, just how easy or difficult is it for 1 person to do everything? I still have some time before I need to make a final decision. I am curious as to what other solo rv'ers have and why. Currently I am not planning on doing a lot of traveling but finding a spot and staying a month or two then going some where else and staying for a while.

Your thoughts and ideas are greatly appreciated. 



__________________
LARRY


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 797
Date:

Not a solo, but I did take our rig (described in my signature below) on a 4 stop trip from San Antonio, TX to Virginia Beach, VA ... to meet up with my wife. I've done it and it wasn't all that hard ... that said, if you don't want to "drive a big truck around", then get a motorhome. Motor homes are a little easier to move, but less "home like" when stationary (IMO). But to repeat ... if you don't like driving a truck around, by all means, get a motorhome. I like big trucks, so my motivation was the opposite of yours. Neither is "better", just different. Good luck and be safe.

__________________

Ron and Janice

 

2016 Ford F350, King Ranch, DRW, 3.73's, 4x4, CC, 6.7 Powerstroke, remote control air lift system

2017 K-Z Durango Gold 381REF (41 ft, 5 slides), MORryde IS, 8K Disc brakes, GY G114  LR H Tires, 27,320 lbs CGVW

Full Timers class of 2016



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 668
Date:

From a "how easy or difficult" standpoint…there's nothing with our 5ver that isn't doable by one person…and the vast majority of what you would do with a Class A is similar. Some things are a bit easier with two people…but if you're on your own then you'll quickly figure out the best way to do the task solo.

For instance…one thing that is easier with two people is backing up to hitch or pulling the Toad up to the back of the Class A to hitch it up. Although it's actually easier to hitch with 2…it's not really the backing up that's easier, it's the whole process of doing a hitch test, checking lights, etc. Solo means you have to keep getting out and in to check stuff. Same with hooking up the Toad…you can't see the tow bars as you pull up to the back of the rig and the first time you'll have to get in and out of the Toad a dozen times. By the time you've hooked up a half dozen times you'll largely have figured out how far to pull up by looking at the back of the rig even though you can't see the tow bars.

 



__________________


RV-Dreams Community Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 18
Date:

My plan is to have a backup camera both on the truck and on the fifth wheel; then practice, practice, etc. in a safe area.


__________________
Dave


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 59
Date:

Due to my wife's health issues, I normally do all of the hooking up and site setup by myself. Hooking up and unhooking our toad is not difficult with our ReadyBrute Elite all terrain aluminum tow bar and brake system. After the first few times you'll know where to position it for hooking up. Setting up the motorhome on a site is also an easy task. I pull or back in, depending on the site type, hit the leveling jacks "Auto" button, and while the coach is leveling, I pull out the power cord and plug in to shorepower. Then I connect the water hose and go inside to extend the slide and set up the items on the bath and kitchen counters that were stowed in the sinks for travel. The sewer hose doesn't get hooked up until it's time to dump the tanks. Total setup time is usually around 20 minutes. My only other setup task is if we want to use our tripod mounted satellite dish, which usually takes another 15 minutes or less to set up and aim. If it's raining out at setup time, I usually just scoot out and plug in the power cord while leveling, leaving the rest for a break in the weather. The awning and front sun screen may or may not get set up eventually, depending on the length of stay, location, and weather.

__________________

Dutch

34' 2001 GBM Landau Class A

2011 Toyota RAV4 4-down toad



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 51
Date:

Are the tasks any more challenging if you only have the limited use of one arm/hand - injured or recovering? Just trying to assess the need for full strength in both hands to do all the setup tasks. The presses the Auto Level and slides in/out buttons should be OK biggrin, but are there other tasks that demand lots of two-handed work or strength.  Recovering rotator cuff patient!!



__________________


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 27
Date:

Welcome Larry.

I'm a fulltime solo/single.  When I turned in my Ohio title to get Florida tags in February, I noticed I've been doing this for 8 years.  In that time I've met exactly TWO solos in anything but a motor home.  They were both on last winter's escape from the snow.  But like you're planning, they also sit a great deal more than they travel.  I've yet to meet a solo with a toad or a pet for at matter.  But remember most solos I meet are rv'ing in a style similar to mine.

I understand tow behinds are more popular for solos out west.  Don't know; don't go there.

You said you plan on staying in one place for extended periods.  Since SS kicked in, I've been spending more time in campgrounds.  But  I still boondock at least 75% of the time.  I very seldom sit for more than a week.  FOR ME, a motor home is just simpler.  For what it's worth,  my C is 28' long and I'd like to find one about 20 feet long.

If you decide to get a pull behind, find one sized to fit a solo and you can get a smaller truck.  The 2 towables I saw this past winter were well under 20 feet.  Remember you'll be retired and living on wheels.  Who do you need to impress?  That crap is for working stiffs and married retirees at resort campgrounds.  I've found the simpler I make my life, the happier I am.

You'll get a lot of advice from non-solos.  Most miss the mark because they have an entirely different mindset.  I'm happily divorced after a marriage of just over 30 years.  I learned single is very different.  Solo full timing is even more so.  

Good luck with your search. If you're up around Pensacola is winter, I'll buy you a cup of coffee.

solo boondocker



__________________


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 797
Date:

solo boondocker wrote:

Welcome Larry.

I'm a fulltime solo/single.  When I turned in my Ohio title to get Florida tags in February, I noticed I've been doing this for 8 years.  In that time I've met exactly TWO solos in anything but a motor home.  They were both on last winter's escape from the snow.  But like you're planning, they also sit a great deal more than they travel.  I've yet to meet a solo with a toad or a pet for at matter.  But remember most solos I meet are rv'ing in a style similar to mine.

I understand tow behinds are more popular for solos out west.  Don't know; don't go there.

You said you plan on staying in one place for extended periods.  Since SS kicked in, I've been spending more time in campgrounds.  But  I still boondock at least 75% of the time.  I very seldom sit for more than a week.  FOR ME, a motor home is just simpler.  For what it's worth,  my C is 28' long and I'd like to find one about 20 feet long.

If you decide to get a pull behind, find one sized to fit a solo and you can get a smaller truck.  The 2 towables I saw this past winter were well under 20 feet.  Remember you'll be retired and living on wheels.  Who do you need to impress?  That crap is for working stiffs and married retirees at resort campgrounds.  I've found the simpler I make my life, the happier I am.

You'll get a lot of advice from non-solos.  Most miss the mark because they have an entirely different mindset.  I'm happily divorced after a marriage of just over 30 years.  I learned single is very different.  Solo full timing is even more so.  

Good luck with your search. If you're up around Pensacola is winter, I'll buy you a cup of coffee.

solo boondocker


 Just for the record ... the question was about how easy or hard it is to RV in a pull behind versus a motor home.



-- Edited by RonC on Wednesday 19th of July 2017 10:33:51 AM

__________________

Ron and Janice

 

2016 Ford F350, King Ranch, DRW, 3.73's, 4x4, CC, 6.7 Powerstroke, remote control air lift system

2017 K-Z Durango Gold 381REF (41 ft, 5 slides), MORryde IS, 8K Disc brakes, GY G114  LR H Tires, 27,320 lbs CGVW

Full Timers class of 2016



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 962
Date:

Go with the MH. Takes maybe two tries to establish where the toad should be to hook up. One advantage is pull into rest area, never have to leave rig to use bathroom, get drink, etc.

__________________

Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
2002 Alpine 36 MDDS (Figment II), 2004 Subaru Forester toad (Mischief)
Blog:  http://www.barbanddave.net/Site/Welcome.html
SPK# 90761 FMCA #F337834



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1536
Date:

Not a solo either, but from my perspective.... it's really going to boil down to how much space you need to feel comfortable living in and what your mobility patterns are. If you feel fine in small spaces, a slide in camper is quite versatile, a class B is also small but drives just like a van (only taller), a lot of solo RVers have class C rigs. If you feel the need to wander a lot from your camp site, a MH, or even a class C with a "toad" seems a reasonable option. Big 5ers and TTs are probably not so good for solo operations due to backing up single handed (not impossible but certainly not a picnic either, anecdotal evidence). Earlier comments about hooking up toads seem thoughtful. In the end, you'll find a way to make whatever you pick work for you. Being  solo, has it's own set of variables when everything works the way it should, but when things happen, go wrong or just won't co-operate being solo can be challenging. Not trying to discourage you, but "solo boondocker" seems to be speaking from some experience with a bit of mental gymnastics thrown in for good measure to "keep it real" for the budding solo adventurer. Even as a non-solo... I'd seek him out for a different perspective, just in case RV life hands me a curve ball I can't handle. All viewpoints are valid.

JMHO, Good luck.



-- Edited by BiggarView on Wednesday 19th of July 2017 12:23:28 PM

__________________

Brian, Cindi & Josie (our fur baby)



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 59
Date:

IrishRover wrote:

Are the tasks any more challenging if you only have the limited use of one arm/hand - injured or recovering? Just trying to assess the need for full strength in both hands to do all the setup tasks. The presses the Auto Level and slides in/out buttons should be OK biggrin, but are there other tasks that demand lots of two-handed work or strength.  Recovering rotator cuff patient!!


 I parked next to a fellow with one arm a couple of years ago. He seemed to manage all aspects of parking and setting up his motorhome fairly easily, with some tasks just taking a bit longer. With the help of a couple of inverted 'V' supports for the tow bar made of PVC pipe, he even managed unhooking and hooking up his toad with little trouble. I think he was in his late 60's, and his remaining arm had an impressive bicep! smile



__________________

Dutch

34' 2001 GBM Landau Class A

2011 Toyota RAV4 4-down toad



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 254
Date:

Most of my camping is alone in a TT. No issues except backing up safely requires getting out to check. Sometimes two or three times.

__________________

2015 Winnebago TT 2101DS & Chevy Tahoe LTZ, 300 watts of WindyNation solar - parallel w/MPPT, 2 Trojan T-125s. TALL pole for USC & historical flags. 14 year Army vet. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, USF&WS, NPS, TVA, state & county campgrounds



RV-Dreams Community Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 18
Date:

I'll be a solo in 3-6 months (have to wait until after I retire; then I have to sell the house and get a rig).

Right now I'm leaning towards a 5th wheel; meaning I have to learn how to back in successfully. Plus how to turn in tight spots.

My thought process leans first towards CCC. I've not been impressed by the Class C's I have seen re carrying capacity. I don't care how much storage space there is, if you can't safely put anything there and have to travel with empty water tanks.

Class A's are more usable for me. So far the smaller gas powered Class A's (typically the Ford F53 chassis) haven't impressed me. A bigger diesel is possible; I'd just have to find an "old enough" unit to fit my budget.

The fifth wheels I've visited have had the best impression. Mentally, they really "feel like" a small apartment. They feel like a place I could live for "years".

Whatever I get, I may or may not buy new.

I may lean in a different direction as the time gets closer. So far, I don't think there will be a problem being solo. I just have to really know what I'm doing.

Dave


__________________
Dave


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 51
Date:

Dutch wrote

 I parked next to a fellow with one arm a couple of years ago. He seemed to manage all aspects of parking and setting up his motorhome fairly easily, with some tasks just taking a bit longer. With the help of a couple of inverted 'V' supports for the tow bar made of PVC pipe, he even managed unhooking and hooking up his toad with little trouble. I think he was in his late 60's, and his remaining arm had an impressive bicep! smile


Thanks Dutch. That is impressive. At least I'm recovering and hopefully back to more that 50% by the time we start full-time. Only about 10% now. There are always those people that we may perceive as less fortunate or in some way handicapped, that can really impress you in overcoming almost any obstacle.



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us