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Post Info TOPIC: Dual Pane Windows


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Dual Pane Windows


We have been researching windows as part of our decision-making process for RVs. Peggy has been interested in dual pane windows.

We went to the RV show in Portland, OR this month and were told that dual pane windows were a waste of money because (a) they only add an R factor of 1 and (b) the vibration associated with the movement of an RV causes the seals to crack which, in turn, causes condensation between the windows. The only redeeming feature is that they can have a sound reducing quality for outside noise.

So, fact check: For those of you that have dual pane windows, what have you actually seen as advantages and disadvantages to this option?

Any feedback is appreciated.

Richard



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Richard


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I would not buy a rig without insulated windows. 



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Mike & Karen

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I really don't know what the R value is, but they help with condensation, insulation and help a bit with sounds from the outside. I have them and would recommend them. But that's just MO.

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We have them also and would not buy a rig without them. Agree with Ron and would mention the same three points.

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Ditto all the other comments.  Keeps heat and cold out, helps with sound insulation.



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It was part of our need list. It really helps keeping our RV cooler and definitely helps with noise.

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Finally on the road September 2015 !



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I would agree with the previous comments and would get them again but you do need to plan on replacing them as the seals go. In 10 years with two different rvs, I have replaced at least 10 windows due to fogging. Have had both Hehr windows as well as Kinro (Lippert) and both fared about the same. Rvs were both purchased new.

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We have them and wouldn't be without them. That was a requirement when buying. If for not other reason than the condensation. I've been in RV's with single pain windows when it's cool and water is running down the windows.

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Richard, this wasn't same person that told you about "carrying capacity varies with the number of lugs on the wheels" was it? It's true that dual panes do not add a ton of R rating (but even adding 1 to its R rating can be upto 15% more than what was there and more means less AC run time or heater run time adding up to money in your pocket), but that air gap between the panes definitely cuts interior condensation on your windows, and cuts exterior sound considerably all things being equal. Interior humidity is your evil enemy in an RV or a sticks & bricks.  You can alleviate some with proper ventilation, dual panes are a no brainer for keeping it from forming on your windows and subsequently dripping down and then into your walls if you don't stay on top of it constantly. Think mold. YUCK!



-- Edited by BiggarView on Friday 30th of September 2016 06:31:53 PM

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Brian, Cindi & Josie (our fur baby)



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We don't have them and wish we did.

Rob



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So, to recap:

Dual pane windows are definitely worth the investment. Upsides include (a) added insulation value, (b) reduced condensation in the unit and (c) reduced level of outside noise. The only potential downside is that the windows could require replacement around the 10-year mark.

Thank you all very much for taking the time.

-Richard



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Richard


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I agree with the others regarding dual pane windows.  It's one of our "must haves" for full-timers, but not necessarily for infrequent users of the RV (although still highly recommended).  The dual pane windows add expense and weight which might not be justifiable for a light weight trailer that doesn't get used much.  But if it's in the budget, we still recommend them.

The windows installed on most RVs are done by a limited number of companies and the seals between the panes are not of the highest quality.  Couple that with constant vibration of going down the road and the seals are known to fail over time causing fogging between the windows.  It may not happen at all for some, it may happen after ten years for others, and it may happen well before ten years for many.  And it doesn't happen all at once - it's usually a window or two at a time. 

If you let the fogging go too long, it can etch into the glass requiring full replacement of the glass panes rather than just removal, cleaning, and re-sealing.  It can be expensive either way.

For anyone interested, we wrote a detailed post when we had all of our windows re-sealed back in February 2015 - Suncoast Designers - Fogged Window Repair.  We got our rig new in 2005 and our first window failed in 2012, then we had others fail in 2014 leading us to re-seal all of them in early 2015.



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Unless the RV is for occasional "weekending" don't skimp on dual pane widows.  It's all been pretty well said as to why.  The potential after many years to have to repair them is well worth the advantages.  You likely will regret not having them - especially the first morning you get up with water dripping on the inside of the rig from overnight condensation.

Our last fiver went 8+ years, with 85,000 hard road miles on it, and did not require window repair.  So, "it depends."



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Richard_Peggy wrote:


So, to recap:

Dual pane windows are definitely worth the investment. Upsides include (a) added insulation value, (b) reduced condensation in the unit and (c) reduced level of outside noise. The only potential downside is that the windows could require replacement around the 10-year mark.

Thank you all very much for taking the time.

-Richard


 I don't think you can expect them to last 10 years.  I have replaced them as soon as the first year of ownership.   They will fail at random intervals.   My DRV Suite was sold at 4 years old and I had already replaced some windows due to seal loss and fogging but others were still Ok.



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I am another dual pane window advocate, personally I really like them.
My Redwood came with dual pane windows standard so even though I bought off the lot, all Redwood 5th Wheels have them.
My dual pane windows are now a little over two years old with no issues yet and I move / travel year round about every two weeks so they really get a work out on these fine roads in our country.
Recently just completed a several month trip to Pensacola FL, Atlanta GA, Charleston SC, North Myrtle Beach SC, Virginia Beach VA, Hammonton NJ, Cleveland OH, Shipshewana IN, Branson MO, Tupelo MS and then back to my home base in Florida for a few weeks.


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Would you buy or build a new house without dual pane Windows?

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I don't know how much they actually help. But I do know our current RV has them and stays just as comfortable as our house at temps in the 20's or at 105. It's 14 years old and has no fogging on any of the windows. On a new build I wonder how much it increases the cost?

Mark

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At an RV show I was told that "dual pane" is not the same as the "thermal pane" windows I have at home. My home windows have a special reflective coating and an insulating gas in between. What is between the glass panes of an rv dual pane window? Is there any real data on performance? Thanks.

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Thanks


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Thermal pane and dual pane is the same thing. "Thermal Pane" is a brand name that has gained a certain amount of acceptance like Kleenex has become the defacto name for facial tissue. However, any type of window can be manufactured to different tolerances and, in the case of your house, with inert gas as an insulating medium between glass layers and special coatings reflect radiant solar heat. Most, if not all, RV windows come in either single or dual pane windows. I have yet to find one that uses triple pane or that uses inert gas between them, but I could be wrong. Since RV are not typically built the the same construction standards as a full fledged house, I doubt you will ever see truly energy efficient windows beyond simple dual panes owing to the cost.

JHMO, Brian



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Brian, Cindi & Josie (our fur baby)



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Honeydeaux wrote:

I would not buy a rig without insulated windows. 


 Same for us.  For weekends, single pane would be ok.  For fulltiming, you want double pane.  Not only helps with cooling/heating, but also with noise from outside.



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We love our dual pane windows for all the above reasons. Ours are 10 years old and a few are ready to be resealed. We will most likely go with the same company that Howard and Linda used to have them repaired.

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