2018 RV-Dreams Spring Educational Rally - April 23 -29, 2018 in Pahrump, Nevada
Spots Still Available!! Click Here To Get More Information & To Register


Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: 1999 Newmar MountainAire 3565 Gas


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 95
Date:
1999 Newmar MountainAire 3565 Gas


So tomorrow I'll go look at a 1999 Newmar MountainAire 3565 gas motorhome with just under 35K miles.  https://www.rvtrader.com/listing/1999-Newmar-NewMar-Mountain-Aire-3565-5002616195

I recently looked at some other lower priced units at the same dealer and they were real dogs.  Then the salesman called about this one and says it's really clean and nice.  I'll know for sure when I see it, of course.  But assuming it is as nice as he says, I'm wondering about how to go about checking it out and dealing on it.

I plan to test drive and then turn everything on to see if it works, etc.  I'll also want to review all the paperwork available to learn about service performed, etc.  

As to value, I'm wondering if they're asking a reasonable price or not.  According to NADA (and other places I've researched) the 3565 model wasn't out until 2000.  So I looked up the model and features for that year and the best average retail I could get is just under $17,840, with a base of $15,150.  Is the low miles with a $6,000 premium?  

For background, I live with my elderly dad and I'm wanting to get something to vacation with for now, and then after my dad is no longer with us, I'll go full-time.  I don't want to spend a lot right now, in case it turns out I don't really like the life-style.  Then, if I really take to it and I want to upgrade later, I will.  So, either way, this will likely not be a long-term unit (or it might) and I'll have to think about it's value on the back end.  In my experience whenever I get bitten in the back-end it's because I didn't buy it right at the front end.  That's the mistake I want to avoid, no matter what I buy.

I'm sorry for posting this with such short notice, but I'd like any advice you all could offer.

 

Thanks.

 

Patti



__________________


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 29
Date:

Just a story about what I figured out a few years ago when I was shopping for older motorhomes. They aren't always what they seem. I was looking at a coach that seemed in pretty good shape, drove nice etc. This was an aluminum sided coach. Upon further inspection I noticed some pin holes in the siding under the windows. It got me to wondering about what was going on. I stood back and looked, the holes were in going down at about a 45 deg angle toward the back of he coach. I went inside and pulled the couch away from the wall and there was obvious evidence of water damage. What had happened was the window had leaked and the water incursion had started to rot the side of the coach. My point being that if anything seems out of sorts or there is any evidence of recent repairs look for something that may have caused that. Especially look around any roof or sidewall penetrations. When you go to look at the coach don't tell them you're coming just show up. Insist on starting the coach when it is dead cold, that should show up any hard starting issues with the motor. You might also want to open the engine compartment to see if the engine is warm. If it is the coach may have been started to hide cold start issues. This isn't so much of an issue with fuel injection but it won't hurt to see. When you take it for a test drive put it under hard acceleration and see how the transmission shifts. A good transmission will have a nice crisp shift under heavy load, a worn out transmission won't. If the shift is sluggish it's no good. Also look at the engine oil and transmission fluid. Most folks change the engine oil but neglect the transmission fluid. If the transmission fluid smells burnt the trans has been abused. I would also ask to see the manual and use that for your guide to check out the coach. If you see any wires spliced with butt connectors I would want to figure out exactly what they go to and why they were cut and spliced. Also look for any abandoned wires, this is a sure sign of electrical issues in the past and the wires were replaced with something else. I would also charge the plumbing system and ensure that the faucets don't leak (but this is an easy fix) but more importantly the plumbing itself doesn't leak. As to the price premium that's a decision you have to make, but if you want the best deal you have to be willing to walk away from it. This isn't the last coach in the world.

__________________


RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1581
Date:

1999 with only 35,000 miles... sounds like it's been sitting around, parked a lot... . I'd be checking for dry rot in hoses, tires, window seals etc and without checking, any gaskets may be in jeopardy of failing shortly after the engine is fully up and running.  Being that old I'd worry about the roof integrity also. AC units could have had refrigerant leaked out long ago, the covers for them exposed to sunlight over the years will be brittle assuming it was stored outdoors. 

Still, even with low mileage it doesn't mean it wasn't maintained, the pix suggest it certainly is clean looking... buyer beware and good luck.



-- Edited by BiggarView on Friday 4th of May 2018 08:48:05 AM

__________________

Brian, Cindi & Josie (our fur baby)



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 5129
Date:

Basically, I thought the same as Brian with regards to the mileage and age of the RV.  That's only an average of 1842 miles a year.  As a general guideline, most with motor homes prefer to run their units up to operating temperatures about every month of so.  While an "exercise" trip of 50 miles every month wouldn't be as much as the average, I'd worry that some years might have gone without much exercising of the unit's power train.

Terry



__________________

Terry and Jo

2010 Mobile Suites 38TKSB3
2008 Ford F450
2014 Ford Expedition 4X4 as Tag-along or Scout

Two minor works in progess....pictures taken over the years and a webblog:

Our photos on Smugmug

Ignoring the Barking Dogs  -  Terry's Blog



RV-Dreams Family Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 95
Date:

Thanks to all for your replies and the ideas of what to look for. I used many of them, like smelling the transmission fluid (it was pretty much odorless), and looking at all the gaskets, seals, rubber parts, etc. that I could see. The test drive around corners and on curves felt like I was on a boat - new shocks needed? It ran fine, but the passing acceleration wasn't really crisp. I think I'd attribute it more to an almost-20 y.o. vehicle. The dash A/C tried really hard, but didn't quite get there. Maybe it just needs to be charged . . . or ?? The windows are single-pane, I think, so I didn't see fogging. The plastic rear bumper was either loose or it had been bumped in on one end. The roof looked OK and the cabinets seemed to all be lined up and not separating from the structure. The paper covering on some of the wall board was split and flaking. I noticed it most under the driver's side-window - condensation?

I think I could make an acceptable deal on it, but I also want to look for a diesel MH. I looked at one today being sold by owner. It's a 1998 Holiday Rambler Endeavor 34 ft. It's good cosmetically, but I'm not sure about all the mechanics. There are 3 windows fogging. The roof on the street-side was separating from the wall where it had been riveted. The owner has since texted me that he's screwed and caulked it down.

At least I'm getting an education out of all this exploration.

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us