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Post Info TOPIC: Crew Cab versus Extended Cab


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Crew Cab versus Extended Cab


OK, I must admit I'm confused ... or I haven't done enough research yet.

I'm looking at a Ford F-250 Diesel to pull a Keystone Montana 5th Wheeler. I do not want a regular cab but want a four door model. However, I don't seem to be able to figure out what the difference is between a Crew Cab and an Extended Cab. What am I missing here?

Also, if I get a four door model, does it have to be a long (98.0) or short (81.8) model ... or would either do to pull a Montana?

Finally, would it be better to go with the RWD or 4WD option? I'm looking at a Lariat becuse I want a little comfort too but, don't see why I'd have to pony up for a King Ranch if I went for the Crew Cab option.

Paul

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Crew cab

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
300px-DodgeRam1500_crewcab.jpg
magnify-clip.png
A Dodge Ram 1500 crew cab

Crew Cabs are an extended cab bodystyle commonly found on utes or pickup trucks. This cab design typically has forward-facing rear seating and four front-hinged doors to provide sedan-like accommodations for up to 6 passenge
The extended cab has smaller back doors and smaller bench seat.
I will let someone else address the length of the beds as they vary.



-- Edited by mktobob on Monday 26th of July 2010 12:49:39 PM

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Bob and Sue
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Our F250 has an extended cab. We pull a 38' Montana.

Our truck is good for our needs regarding the back seat. If we had family traveling, it would be a different story. We do get our granddaughters regularly when we are in the area. They both are still in car seats and there is enough room for them.

A grown person would be quite uncomfortable sitting back there for a length of time.

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I've been led to believe that the short wheelbase gives a much choppier ride than the long wheelbase models. Also, If you are going to full time in it you should probably go for as much passenger and storage room as you can get.

-- Edited by Luvglass on Monday 26th of July 2010 07:56:13 PM

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Fred Wishnie

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Fred when you say the short wheelbase gives a choppier ride as compared to the long wheelbase, are you talking about when towing or not towing. The reason I ask is because I have an F150 with extended cab and short bed and don't notice that choppier ride even when towing a boat. I have had trucks all my life so maybe thats why I don't notice a difference. Granted I have never driven a long bed truck before to compare. Thanks

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I think both. It's logical that a short length will react more quickly to a change in height than a long length.

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Fred Wishnie

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Luvglass wrote:

I think both. It's logical that a short length will react more quickly to a change in height than a long length.



The crew cab long bed F-250 wheelbase is 172.4 inches.  The extended cab short bed wheelbase is 156.2 inches.  Betcha I couldn't tell the difference in choppy ride. 
Now, if you are talking about a Smart Car and a Long Bed Crew Cab F-250, yeah, the ride in a Smart Car would certainly be "more active" at comparable speeds on the same road.   

I question if a normal person would be able to tell much difference in ride quality, with all suspension and tire air pressure equal.

 We drive a Chevy Tahoe and an F-250 CC-SB, and it seems the Tahoe is more active, but the truck is rougher because of suspension and air pressure in the tires.  Neither is bad or uncomfortable.

It's all a matter of personal preference and a good subject for discussion.



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   I think you've already received some good feedback on your questions, but I'll add my 2 cents FWIW. I think the crew vs. extended cab has been accurately defined in the replies.
   In regards to 98 vs. 81.8, I assume you're referring to the bed length? That being the case, I think there are two things to consider. One is personal preference. Longer bed means more storage but also a longer truck. I have a crew cab, 8 ft bed and it's 20' long +/- The other thing to consider is only something of which I have read and cannot say if it is fact, but I'll throw it out there, so maybe those more experienced can elaborate. That being that a fifth wheel can be damaged in a tight turn radius with a short bed, due to not enough space between the cab and the trailer. I read something at one point about a hitch design that would allow the assembly to move rearward while turning to eliminate the problem but can't supply any details, as I decided to go long bed and didn't persue it further. Hopefully, those more in the know will elaborate. 
   I agree with the comments about longer wheelbase equaling a smoother ride, with or without vehicle in tow. I think whether or not it amounts to something worth considering boils down to personal preference. The other thing is I think wheelbase may vary according to model year. I have an older truck and it's 168", as opposed to the 172.4 mentioned.
   Two or 4wd is again going to depend on your situation. I would suggest you consider whether or not you have a need for 4wd. If not, you might want to go 2wd, as I believe the 2wd models have a bit higher towing capacity, as they are lighter, not having the added weight of the 4wd componenets (transfer case etc.)
   I'm sure you've already heard it but, whatever you decide, it's important that the rig is within the proper weight ratings for your tow vehicle/trailer.

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If you're hauling people the "Crew Cab" is the best fit for comfort and ride.  I went with the "Super Cab" because of budget and the higher payload rating.  I have driven both trucks (all Fords) and I can't say that the ride was any better with the longer wheel base but maybe my rear end isn't sensitive enough. LOLbiggrin  Another thing to keep in mind is the torque loss with the longer wheelbase, the manufacturers don't always post separate specs for torque @ the rear wheels but you do have torque loss with a longer drive (shaft) train.  Also the turning radius for the longbed/crew-cab trucks can be a pain in the a** in some situations.  Both trucks have their good and bad points; pick the one that will work best for your situation.  Happy Camping! 


http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/5024-supercab-vs-crewcab.html

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I've always had crew cabs for three main reasons.

1. You can carry five large adults or 6 thin adults comfortably.
2. The rear seat is great for dogs or kids to be comfortable on long trips.
3. The rear seat is great for carrying expensive stuff you don't want to leave in the bed of the truck and don't want to clutter up the trailer with. Toolboxes, extra DVD/TV,laptop...etc.

Usually, I find the long wheelbase to be a much better ride when empty or loaded than a shorter wheelbase.

There have been times when the longer wheelbase has actually made for a rougher ride. Especially when the highway expansion joints are spaced just right. It will setup an oscillation in the truck that can be quite spectacular. We crossed a bridge in the Sacramento area and about halfway across the oscillation became so bad (actually fun) that I hit my head on the roof of the truck. It felt like we were on Mr. Toad's Wild Ride at Disneyland. We were laughing so hard we had tears in our eyes. I can only remember a few times when this has been a problem.

Overall, I find the full sized bed and longer wheelbase of a crew cab better for what we do with a truck. Not just for towing but for hauling stuff like lumber, furniture and trash.

I've had short bed trucks and found the ride choppy most of the times empty or loaded on the freeways around southern California.

I would only get a four wheel drive if I lived in snow country or planned to be off road a lot. In the 35 years I've been towing, I only needed a four wheel drive twice. Once was my fault (soft sand), the other time was due to a slippery steep hill in a campground.

-- Edited by The Bear II on Tuesday 27th of July 2010 12:04:02 PM

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For another 2 cents of perspective which others may not agree with –

First get a truck with an 8’ foot bed.  Using the bed length of 8 feet gives you more room and will simply ride better regardless of the size of the trailer.  Naturally it will never require a slider hitch and all that could entail. It also gives you room for an aux fuel tank which some say you don’t need.  I disagree completely.  But that's just me.  It has nothing to do with how far you can go between pit stops.  It has to do with travel where fuel is either scarce or more difficult to get with the trailer attached. I see this every day for the guys traveling with us who just have the standard tanks as we travel the 50th state and Canada. I’ve seen it a lot in the lower 48 as well. 

As to crew vs. extended cab, look at the turning radius of the two trucks.  That is somewhat of a factor when backing the rig.  Not a gigantic factor as you will learn to deal with the longer tow vehicle (crew) if you get a crew cab without too much trouble.  But it is a small factor with the crew being longer than the extended cab.

The crew has more space and for some this is important as a place to stow or carry equipment.  I carry all my tools in the back seat area.  I want the tools with me in the truck, not in the trailer when I am off solo and might need them.  Also it keeps them out of the moisture.  Again, that’s just me.

Four wheel drive is just like insurance – you don’t need it till you do and then you need it real bad.  So that is just a personal choice.  I have it and have been glad I do.

Get a diesel regardless IMHO.

My truck is a 2006 Chevy crew – dual rear wheels – four wheel drive – 8 foot bed – diesel – 50 gallon aux Transfer Flow tank.  I am very happy with the rig.  So far it’s taken me from the east coast, up the Alcan to Valdez, AK without a whimper.  My trailer is just shy of 39 feet long.

My 2 cents should it be of help -

Bill



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Jim


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Paul

As Bill mentioned, I like the crew cab for the extra storage. 

Prefer long bed so I don't need a slider hitch

Prefer 4WD

I don't know how heavy a 5th wheel you are considering but one important thing you may want to think about is getting dual rear wheels.  You will need to move up to a one ton for this though.  DRW will give you much more stability on the road, more rubber on the road when you apply the brakes, and more control should you have a rear tire blow.

Good luck in your search, take your time, and have fun.

 

Jim

 



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Like I stated in the other thread I suggest 1 ton dual wheel minimum.From the voice of experience you won't regret it.Even if you don't plan to off road much ask the guy I pulled out of the flat grassy spot in Klamath,California after a couple days rain how he feels about 4 wheel drive.As stated 4 wheel drive is a waste until you need it but at least you have it.My first truck was a 2 wheel drive 3/4 ton and this 1 ton dually 4x4
out performs it by miles.It's cheaper to get the right equipment the first time around.
The crew cab gives you a lot of extra storage for items you don't want to put in the bed of the truck or in the storage bays of the trailer.

-- Edited by Racerguy on Tuesday 27th of July 2010 06:34:02 PM

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Many thanks to all responders!

I'm thinking 1, 2 or 3 year-old F-250 or F-350 Crew Cab Lariat. I do NOT like the looks of the 2011 models.

Does not have to be 4WD but will take it if it's there ... definately do NOT want dual rear wheels ... short bed or long bed is not something I'm worried about since if I get a short bed I'll get an automatic slider and, of course, it has to be diesel.

Color just, well, just has to look good!

Now ... I have to try and locate one!

Paul

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2011 Keystone Montana 3455SA 5th Wheeler / 2010 Ford F-350 Crew Cab Lariat 4X2 SWB
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I'd re-think the dual rear wheels (DRW). The stability vs. single rear wheels (SRW) is very noticeable. I've towed the same 5th wheel with both SRW & DRW trucks and feel much more confident with the DRW.

If you read through the answers above, many suggest DRW or indicate they are satisfied with their DRW trucks.



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I would also rethink the dually,  I know that my DW did not like the dually at first but is very glad that we got it.  She also is now a big fan of driving it and sometimes I think she enjoys driving more then I do. 

John and Terri

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One thing about dualies, small streets in many towns make side trips problematic.

You don't say where you are...
For sale---
I have a 2003 F350 Ford Lariat 7.3 Diesel Crew Cab (the biggest cab). Set up for 5th wheel or TT towing. K&N filter. Less than 50k miles.
I had to get rid of 5th wheel due to wifes handicap.

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All of our Trucks have been DRW', my opinion its the only way to go. As for using the DRW Truck I haven't never had a problem going were ever I need to go. Of course I don't go thru drive thru's. But I never went thru drive thru's with the one SRW truck.. We do have a car with us but, I have no problem using the Freightliner as a daily driver. I still drive the Freightliner ever week. Its such a great ride, rides better than anything I have ever owne. Good Luck with your choice. GBY...


P.S. You can have to much Trailer but never to much Truck.

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Delaine and Lindy wrote:

P.S. You can have to much Trailer but never to much Truck.



Ya'll sure have a sweet rig, but not all of us can afford a rig that nice. Heck, if you gave if to me free of charge, I couldn't afford its care and feeding. Though not full timing yet, I may soon be in my little Aliner - if I'm lucky and the bankruptcy judge doesn't take it when they take my house. Unladen, my tow vehicle gets better mileage than your toad (It's got the same engine, but is lighter and tow tuned to get between 22-25 mpg towing my camper.) What does your frieghtliner get, 6-8 mpg with 15-20% more costly diesel fuel? I just returned from a 1,550 mile trip spending less than $200 in fuel. Too much truck is one you can't afford to drive because of: fuel costs, maintenance costs, tires, insurance, taxes, initial cost/depreciatiation, etc.

No one knows the future, but some experts predict that fuel could easily rise to the $7-$9 gallon range within the next few years if things deteriorate politically (ie, cap & trade, drilling moratorium, Venesualian oil boycott, hyperinflation, etc.). If this worst-case scenario actually materializes, I'm sure many may wish they were towing a Hi-lo with a 1/2 ton.

All I'm saying is that one would be wise to at least consider the possibility of escalating future fulltiming costs, a falling dollar, and uncertain investment returns when deciding on a TV. If not, we may find ourselves in a situation where we can only afford to move seasonally, at best.

Chip 

P.S. Thank you for your military service. You're a better man than I, as I could only take the Army for 9 yrs. before mustering out. :)



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